The Ghosts of the Tsunami

A very powerful story about the dead and the living and all the places in between:

 

“At the heart of ancestor worship is a contract. The food, drink, prayers, and rituals offered by their descendants gratify the dead, who in turn bestow good fortune on the living. Families vary in how seriously they take these ceremonies, but even for the unobservant, the dead play a continuing part in domestic life.”

Read the full piece here: The Ghosts of the Tsunami

About ganglerisgrove

Galina Krasskova has been a Heathen priest since 1995. She holds a Masters in Religious Studies (2009), a Masters in Medieval Studies (2019), has done extensive graduate work in Classics including teaching Latin, Roman History, and Greek and Roman Literature for the better part of a decade, and is currently pursuing a PhD in Theology. She is the managing editor of Walking the Worlds journal and has written over thirty books on Heathenry and Polytheism including "A Modern Guide to Heathenry" and "He is Frenzy: Collected Writings about Odin." In addition to her religious work, she is an accomplished artist who has shown all over the world and she currently runs a prayer card project available at wyrdcuriosities.etsy.com.

Posted on October 30, 2017, in Ancestor Work, Ancestors, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I read this piece a bit ago and loved it so much. It’s so well-written and interesting — it reminds me of some of the readings I’ve encountered on the Eumenides and the restless dead in Hellenism.

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  2. Wow! That is a very powerful article.

    It reminds me of an article I read years ago on Llewellyn’s website. A foreigner who was travelling in Japan went with a local family to visit their Grandfather’s grave. The Grandmother had reservations about bringing a foreigner to the grave, but the family insisted that he come. After the family made offerings to the Grandfather’s grave, a voice could be heard asking “Why did you bring a foreigner here?”

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