Polytheist Quotes

One of the projects dear to me is in re-building a devotional practice to our Gods. Devotions are the very backbone of religious praxis and experience. There was a meme circulating a while ago stating: “What they won’t teach you about the founders of western science, math, medicine and philosophy is that they believed in the ancient Gods.” This is sadly in most cases very true.

I’ve decided to start a new project, pulling authentic quotes and prayers to share across social media as a reminder that these great minds were Polytheists, that they themselves would have engaged in devotional practices. They weren’t afraid of theophany, direct experience with the Gods. They recognized it for the blessing it is. If you care to contribute your own favorite quotes feel free to share them in the comments below. These graphics are meant to be shared, so please do share them.

The images will be housed and updated over in a photo album on my official Facebook author page. This album will be added to as time and opportunity permits.

The first couple are below.

dionysos

Αἰσχύλο (also known as Aiskhylos, or Aeschylus) was born circa 525/524, and passed away circa 456/455 BC. He was an ancient Greek playwright, sometimes colloquially called the father of tragedies. Only a few of his estimated 70 plus plays have survived, among them is his trilogy of plays in The Oresteia (comprised of Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, and The Eumenides) represents the only complete trilogy of Greek plays by any playwright still extant, and it has been theorized that he was the first playwright to create stories told in trilogies. He also seems to have introduced to the theater more complex character interactions and more characters into his works then what had been standard before then. His plays won him first prize in the coveted Great Dionysia (a great festival dedicated to Dionysos) on more than one occasion.

66222043_2894092287284839_3496485691162886144_o

In this direct quote from Aiskhylos, we see an understanding in why we engage in devotional practices and veneration to the Gods.

About ganglerisgrove

Galina Krasskova has been a Heathen priest since 1995. She holds a Masters in Religious Studies (2009), a Masters in Medieval Studies (2019), has done extensive graduate work in Classics including teaching Latin, Roman History, and Greek and Roman Literature for the better part of a decade, and is currently pursuing a PhD in Theology. She is the managing editor of Walking the Worlds journal and has written over thirty books on Heathenry and Polytheism including "A Modern Guide to Heathenry" and "He is Frenzy: Collected Writings about Odin." In addition to her religious work, she is an accomplished artist who has shown all over the world and she currently runs a prayer card project available at wyrdcuriosities.etsy.com.

Posted on July 31, 2019, in Bacchic Things, Classics, devotional work, Lived Polytheism, Polytheism and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Hello Galina, beautiful quotes! Great work, as always!
    I wanted to share with you that today, August 1st is the day of the Pachamama a Latin America indigeous earth goddess that lives in the Andes. Pachamama means “mother earth”. Years back I visited some sacred sites of Her in the Puna, at the north or Argentina, where I live. She is still being worshiped and people put offerings to Her on the ground and dance for Her on Her day. In some villages the celebrations last the whole month. I do not have latin american indigeous blood in my veins (I come from an european family) but this Goddess is generous and I honor Her as part of the local spirits. I send you a link to a local newspaper (sorry it is in spanish) with some pictures of last year´s rites and a painting of the Goddess by a local artist.
    I thought that it would make you happy.
    Have a nice day.
    Kind regards, Vanesa
    https://www.infobae.com/vidriera/2017/08/01/el-norte-celebra-a-la-pachamama-con-imponentes-festejos/
    https://www.infobae.com/tendencias/2019/08/01/1-de-agosto-por-que-se-toma-cana-con-ruda-en-el-dia-de-la-pachamama/

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Galina – very awesome quotes and a great project you have started! I read a modern quote somewhere (and I don’t know who said it): If you take ten steps towards the Gods, They will take ten steps towards you. I have found this to be very true!

    Vanesa – I didn’t know that Pachamama is still worshiped. That’s great!! I loved the pictures in the articles 🙂 A friend of mine went to the Andes in Peru and she said it was amazing there.

    Like

  3. Hello Sparrow I loved the quote you mentioned! It is indeed very true as our Gods value reciprocity.
    The Pachamama is worshiped to the day in all the andine area – close to the Andes mountains. The rites have local variations in each village. The rites are conducted by the elders of each village and consist mainly of incense, food and drink offerings, put in a hollow that is ritually carved in the ground. There is music and traditional dances. The rites are open and public. The local goverments support the festivities. The Pachamama has been syncretized with Virgin Mary cultus in some regions. Anyway, it remains as a very lively tradition.

    Galina here I send you some quotes I love:

    By Aeschylus: “And even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, and in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of the Gods.”

    By Plato: “If a good man sacrifices to the Gods and keeps Them constant company in his prayers and offerings and every kind of worship he can give Them, this will be the best and noblest policy he can follow; it is the conduct that fits his character as nothing else can, and it is his most effective way of achieving a happy life.” (Plato, Laws IV, 716e).

    By Seneca: “In regno nati sumus; deo parere libertas est” “We were born in monarchy: freedom is obeying the Gods.”

    And a cheeky one, by F. Schiller: “Against stupidity even the Gods struggle in vain.”

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Reblogged this on Thesseli.

    Like

%d bloggers like this: