A Massachussetts School Bans the “Odyssey”

The woke brigade strikes again. To preserve their precious feelings and further indoctrinate children with their utter lack of values and virtue, a group #distrupttexts has successfully gotten one of the cornerstones of Western literature banned from a school in MA. Read the full story here


I read an article earlier about this and “teachers” were proud of this ban. Personally, it would be better if they closed the school, and any teacher that advocates for banning books isn’t fit to teach. They’re so eager to virtue signal their “wokeness” *gags* that they are denying this generation’s children a proper education. Homer’s “Iliad” and “Odyssey” are core texts for understanding pretty much all of the literature that came after it. I suppose these woke “teachers” don’t want to have to be bothered to explain different values and customs or, you know, do their jobs and teach. 


I suppose stories about heroism, cleverness, virtue, and fidelity (especially in women) are difficult to teach when the people teaching it have none of those qualities. Those pushing this ban referred to the “Odyssey” as “trash.” I have yet to see their accomplishments, other than denying the children placed in their care a proper education. 


Personally, if you haven’t read the “Odyssey” and the “Iliad” by the time you graduate high school, you’re not ready for college. I only lament that high schoolers aren’t reading them in the original Greek these days.  

The only way these days to guarantee that your children are getting a decent education, one that will render them thinking, literate, historically aware adults is to homeschool. This trend toward banning the best books of world literature, of classic literature is a perfect example of where public education is going. Object to this, parents. Object strongly and never, ever apologize for challenging this censorship. Your children deserve at least that. 

About ganglerisgrove

Galina Krasskova has been a Heathen priest since 1995. She holds a Masters in Religious Studies (2009), a Masters in Medieval Studies (2019), has done extensive graduate work in Classics including teaching Latin, Roman History, and Greek and Roman Literature for the better part of a decade, and is currently pursuing a PhD in Theology. She is the managing editor of Walking the Worlds journal and has written over thirty books on Heathenry and Polytheism including "A Modern Guide to Heathenry" and "He is Frenzy: Collected Writings about Odin." In addition to her religious work, she is an accomplished artist who has shown all over the world and she currently runs a prayer card project available at wyrdcuriosities.etsy.com.

Posted on January 10, 2021, in academic work, Book News, Classics, community, Education, Literary Matters, Misc., Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 31 Comments.

  1. it’s communism 101: destroy the literature, values, culture, and history (or rewrite it — that was a communist practice too) then impose your own valueless garbage on the people who will have nothing of substance left with which to compare it.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Maybe someone will do the students a favor and start passing out copies of the Iliad and Odyssey for free the way missionaries roam about handing out copies of the New Testament.

    Liked by 2 people

    • That’s what I said I’d do if a school at which I taught ever pulled this bullshit. I’d buy out of pocket and bring in a box of the text and tell the kids: “I have been forbidden from teaching you this text filled with sex and violence. It’s the text your parents and the school board and other teachers don’t want you reading and don’t think you have the capacity to read. Here are some free copies.”

      Like

    • Isabella LeCour

      I really love this idea. And can we get them in hotel rooms too?

      Like

  3. Check out “Storm Center” (1956). Bette Davis plays a librarian criticized for not banning a book in her library.

    Liked by 1 person

    • When I was in high school, I stopped a book being banned. A couple of parents had gotten up in arms bc a tom Clancy novel was in the school library and a committee was formed by parents, teachers, administrators to talk about banning it from the school and I spoke fiercely for not banning anything and that carried the day. Now, we’re bending over backwards and taking it up the ass from leftists who have no respect for civilization, culture, literature, or freedom. progress? *sarcasm*

      Liked by 2 people

  4. I am afraid of what comes next from teachers who would ban the Odyssey. America schools banning books? This is what corrupt leaders do to keep people stupid & ignorant. My ancestors who fought for our country are shaking their heads ringing their hands in despair.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Looks like a cultural revolution to me 😦

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I knew that I should have stayed off of the internets today. I have no outlet for the rage this story creates within me. How long can two completely adversarial paradigms occupy the same geographical space? Nothing good comes of this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Petros, this is why I think we have to crush the left with its marxist politics and incipient communism. This is what the first steps of cultural revolution tastes like. I was surprised at how non-partisan the article I linked to was — if anything, it gave quite a bit of space to critics of the ban — thankfully.

      for the record, I’m against banning any book for any reason. If it makes you uncomfortable, too fucking bad. If it challenges your opinions and worldview, too fucking bad. Read *everything* and learn to think and evaluate. Teachers need to take on the challenge of teaching most especially that which makes us uncomfortable.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I agree. My grandfather was a high school literature teacher. He would have been horrified to witness what is happening. His father, a plumber, valued education so much that all six children had to recite a poem, piece of classical literature, or a song each Friday after dinner.
        Surprisingly, my eldest just finished a Classical Literature class as an elective his senior year of college. I was happy to know that they still taught it.

        Like

  7. Isabella LeCour

    I’m a product of public school. Nothing like this was ever covered. It wasn’t even on the summer reading list. However, I did read it as a child because my father coveted the classics. I’m still wondering why Classical Education was dropped out of the public school system. It feels like public school was designed to be inadequate from the start.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m in my 40s. It was required reading in my high school.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Public schools were designed in the 19th century to turn out obedient factory workers (historical fact). classical education was dropped in the mid 20th c. as elitist…you know, like reading. *sarcasm*. I think there’s a difference though between a school not teaching it (sad) and teachers being *forbidden* to teach it.

      Liked by 2 people

    • I am a student of public school, my curriculum included:

      I had to read Shelley’s Frankenstein, Homer’s Odyssey and the Iliad, Beowulf, Hemingway, Faulkner, The Scarlet Letter, Wuthering Heights, Lord of the Flies, Flowers for Algeron, the Agony and the Ecstasy, A Separate Peace, various Shakespeare plays, Great Expectations, Tale of Two Cities, Steinbeck, Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, Canterbury Tales, the Great Gatsby, Miller’s Crucible, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Edgar Allen Poe, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Anne Frank’s Diary, Mark Twain, To Kill a Mockingbird, Medea, Antigone, Aristophane’s the Frogs, the Everyman play, Jane Eyre, works from Maya Angelou, Gulliver’s Travels, Rhime of the Ancient Mariner, James Joyce, de la Barca’s la Vida es Suena in the original Spanish. Excerpts of major world religions and philosophy (Bible, Torah, Koran, Rg Veda, Confucius. Excerpts of Plato and Socrates, and Calvin, and Hobbes, Dante, Machiavelli.

      And that’s just what immediately comes to mind.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Your experience is not the norm and also occurred over a decade ago. As an educator, let me tell you students are NOT being exposed to the bulk of this literature any longer and they are not coming intellectually prepared for college.

        Like

      • I actually had a chance in the last year to talk to a student going through my old high school. The reading list is still 90% the same. But then my old local public school consistently outranks magnates and private schools. I understand it’s an outlier.

        I think it’s more fair to say, that there’s such a vast discrepancy from one public school to another. Similarly you really can’t judge on private versus public versus homeschool, as all of those is different by nature and default.

        I understand there’s a need to change curriculum as time passes, because more history has happened and there’s only a finite amount of time at hand. You have to make room for other texts. But there are certain works which I feel really are key touchstones. The Odyssey is one of those.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. skjoldrdraugsson

    As was said above, I cannot help but agree 110%. They remove the link to our history, culture, values, and ideas. It is then they indoctrinate our youth with ‘new’ versions of rewritten ‘woke’ history, replacing all the truth of our Folk. It is so easy to mold a herd that has chosen to let its roots be weakened and destroyed for so long. All of our history, no matter how twisted or tainted, is essential to the future of all. “Lest we are doomed to repeat it…”

    Liked by 2 people

  9. So when are we all meeting up to sing the entirety of the Odyssey on the school grounds in protest? Because if the book is banned then let’s just go old school and bid the Muses to sing of the storm-tossed man!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’ve actually been considering sending a box of books to them, but I know they’d just get trashed.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s why we need to be a bit more aggressive with this. I’m thinking a few of our favorite translations of Homer and some other Classics while we’re at it, some satyr masks, and a megaphone. Some men just want to watch the world learn 🤡😈👨‍🎓👩‍🎓😜

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Tetrad, I’d support that, but I think a greater threat is the #disrupttexts group. I’d like to see a plan for effectively — EFFECTIVELY–countering their BS, because the attitudes that led to this happening in a MA school, are pandemic. It’s not just one school in one state.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hmm that’s a really good question. What do you think we could do?

      Like

      • atm I’ve no idea, save to oppose them locally. run for school board seats if you are able. be vocal online and off. educate and don’t let their bullshit go unchallenged and never, ever, EVER apologize for challenging them. if I think of more things, I’ll let you know, but this is where getting involved on the local level is really important — like writing to state official, writing to school board, etc. and not stopping.

        Liked by 2 people

      • One thing too that we have that they don’t is the Gods. How about we make some sacrifices to Odysseus and Homer and pray for Their guidance and support in fighting this evil? Angry heroes have been known to act pretty quickly when they get disrespected

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I remember an English professor who taught veterans and used Homer as his text. I believed he wrote a book about how the two epics reached the veterans who related to the combat and aftermath. So, I guess veterans
    need to be protected.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Wyrd Designs, I stand by what I said: public school is shit. You are the exception that proves the rule. I would again point out, you haven’t spent the last ten years teaching. You want to sing the praises for public schools, I’m going to ask you to do that elsewhere. You were lucky (and your school was exceptional. I’m GLAD their curriculum hasn’t changed to any significant degree. I wonder if that will change with this new push to gut the classics?).

    You’re right though about one thing: of all the texts fools might discard, the Iliad and Odyssey are not ones that one should. Nor, ironically is the Bible. No three texts have had more influence on ALL the Western literature that comes after. Not teaching these three texts cuts students off from….everything.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. So the leftists want to do to American school students what they have done in India. In India, schools purposefully leave out any mention of both the Ramayana and the Mahabharata (and other Indic classic literary works). The reason: ‘secularism’. You see, Indian Muslims and Indian Christians live in India too, they can’t expose the tender minds of their children to the literature of the ‘nasty, polytheistic, idol-worshipping Hindu fascists’. After all, isn’t Hinduism ‘devil worship’? (sarcasm)

    Some Western polytheists reading this comment might be stunned, but that is because the Hindus who do keep in touch with the Western polytheist community are strongly-rooted. However, such people are a micro-minority within the larger Hindu community. Those of us who are still connected to Hindu tradition are connected solely because we grew up listening to stories from the epics and other episodes from Hindu traditions from our grandparents and so on. Children who are not lucky enough in this respect grow up on a diet of Bollywood and pop culture, and eventually become not only atheistic but also virulently anti-Hindu. These people cheer for American academics like Prof. Wendy Doniger, who subject Hindu deities to Freudian psychoanalysis (BTW, if you issue even a scholarly rebuttal to the likes of Doniger, they brand you a ‘Hindutva fascist’).

    Now, how is this relevant to Galina’s post? As Galina herself pointed out, the Bible, Iliad and Odyssey have played a critical role in shaping the literature of the Faustian (Western) civilization. Similarly, the Ramayana, Mahabharata and other texts have played a critical role in shaping Hindu civilization. Hindu civilization might be beyond saving at this point (Call me a conspiracy theorist/alarmist if you like, but I can no longer regard as impossible a scenario in which Hinduism dies before the 22nd century dawns. Ironically, this is happening at a time when polytheism is becoming a slow and gradual force in the Western world), but I still think that there is hope for you Westerners, if you take action NOW. Even if you have to resort to violence to crush thugs like Antifa and ally with Christian fundamentalist preachers to destroy the social justice movement, you should not hesitate to do so. Remember, you have more in common with a devout Catholic who attends Mass and performs whatever rituals are there in Catholicism than with some Marxist who uses Neopaganism as a cover for spreading Marxist propaganda.

    Sorry for this rather long comment, but as a Hindu who happens to be a well-wisher of the Western polytheist movement, I thought that I should say this. Best wishes!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am glad you posted. I am aware of some of what is going on in India, but I had no idea this attack on polytheism and traditional culture was happening in the schools (though thinking about it, of course it is. same here: school was designed to break up families and instill secular values and obedience to the state or factory boss). I find it horrifying.

      You are absolutely correct though when you write, “Remember, you have more in common with a devout Catholic who attends Mass and performs whatever rituals are there in Catholicism than with some Marxist who uses Neopaganism as a cover for spreading Marxist propaganda.”

      I wish more polytheists realized that, and likewise realized that Marxism in any form is absolutely incompatible with piety, faith, devotion, and active religion…and the values upon which strong communities are built.

      thank you for posting.

      Liked by 1 person

%d bloggers like this: