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AAR Reading Religion Book Review

 I just had an academic book review published on the AAR (American Academy of Religion’s) ‘Reading Religion’ website. The book I reviewed is Sacred Britannia by Miranda Aldhouse-Green and I would highly recommend it to any practitioner of Celtic or Gaulic polytheism. It would be one of my first go-to sources. Aldhouse-Green also has several other books on Celtic history, archaeology, and religion that I would likewise recommend. My review may be read here

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Book Review from WTW

In the last issue of WTW, we debuted a section on book reviews. I included one on Jennifer Snook’s new book on contemporary Heathenry that I would like to share with you all here now. Interested readers may download the review here

We are currently accepting articles and book reviews for the next issue of WTW. The nominal subject is prayer, but we’re taking pieces on other topics too. If you’re interested in submitting something, please contact me at krasskova at gmail.com. Deadline for this issue is Dec. 1.

REVIEW: “Depths of Praise: A Poseidon Devotional” by T. Poseidonides

pos-devThere is an unexpected elegance to this devotional that I found quite moving. I don’t have a devotional practice to Poseidon, but I am always excited when a new devotional comes out. There’s a fierce satisfaction in seeing the cultus of our Gods growing, in seeing art and prayers, books, devotionals and other markers of cultus coming into being. Because of that, when I saw this book had been published, I jumped at the chance to purchase a copy, nor was I disappointed.

Firstly, I love the organization of the book. I’ve edited devotional anthologies and figuring out the most effective structure and organization is always one of the most difficult parts of the process. This book, if one will pardon the pun, flows very smoothly and I really, really like the way it seems to be focused around various praise names of Poseidon. That alone taught me something new about this God right away.

I also particularly appreciated the final piece, which was a selection of special dates and holy tides at which it is particularly appropriate to honor Poseidon – feast days if you will. This is always one of the most vexing things for me: I’m not used to working on a lunar ritual calendar (common in Greek polytheism) and becoming accustomed has taken some doing. This simple list of suggestions was immensely helpful.

Aside from that, a happily extensive suggestion list for offerings, and the introduction, the book is comprised of prayers to this God. They are lovely. Throughout the book, the author tries to answer the question “Who is Poseidon?” and he does through that exploration of Poseidon’s praise names. The prayers are quite poetic, possessing and almost architectural elegance, and they show an understanding of the culture and literature of ancient Greece. One has a sense of continuity therefore, in reading these prayers, a sense of affinity and connection to all those who, for generations honored this God, as so many do today as well. There is a measured grace to this devotional and the author’s devotion and respect for Poseidon infuse every page.

I highly recommend this to anyone interested in venerating Poseidon. It is a worthy offering and a beautiful read. 5/5 stars.

The book is available here