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On the evil eye

So the other day was the anniversary of a very small book that I wrote about the Evil Eye. The book was a result of a four-week course I taught (not academically but within my religious community) about how to deal with the evil eye. I never used to give the evil eye or “malocchio” any thought at all. I even poo-pooed the use of eye charms, but they do actually work, at least as a preventative. It wasn’t until I was hit with the eye myself that I gave it serious attention. I should have known better from the start: traditions about how to ward off the evil eye date back to Sumer. You find them not only in Greece but across world. Even in the southwest, I saw many lintels and doors painted blue to ward off evil. 

Now, why blue one might ask? Well, I don’t know, but I can tell you that it’s the rarest color in nature, once one of the most expensive, and throughout the history of painting has consistently been associated with holy things. In the American Southwest, as I noted above, one often sees doors and window frames painted a bright turquoise blue; in the Southeast, porch ceilings might be painted a color called “haint” blue, in both cases to ward off evil. The best evil eye charms are likewise blue, often in the shape of an eye – a case of fighting like with like. The hamza (a representation of the protective hand of the God El) may also be used (sometimes the two are combined in the same pendant). 

The earliest references to malocchio talk about it as an evil spirit. I have often wondered if those who can cast it (and many don’t do it on purpose. I find that there is a particular personality type that is able to cast the eye: they tend to be passive aggressive and deeply envious of the good fortunes, or perceived good fortunes, of those around them) aren’t really just tagging the victim in a way that calls the evil spirit forth. Fortunately, there are a list of signs and symptoms to watch out for and it’s not that difficult to banish. I cover all of this in my book and give quite a few academic sources for those who want to do a deeper dive than my brief course and text allow. 

Bookversary: Combating the Evil Eye

Affiliate Advertising Disclosure

Today is the fifth publication anniversary.

“The history of malocchio–the evil eye–crosses multiple cultures, and apotropaic charms and practices have persisted through to the modern day. Combatting the Evil Eye explores how to diagnose and treat this condition. It offers a range of traditional and not-so-traditional cures and a plethora of resources for this often overlooked but potentially devastating affliction.”

Have you nabbed a copy yet from amazon?

Hey don’t give me the evil eye on my bookversary. ^_~

Today marks the two year anniversary of my book:
🧿 Combatting the Evil Eye 🧿

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Combatting the Evil Eye

The history of malocchio–the evil eye–crosses multiple cultures, and apotropaic charms and practices have persisted through to the modern day. Combatting the Evil Eye explores how to diagnose and treat this condition. It offers a range of traditional and not-so-traditional cures and a plethora of resources for this often overlooked but potentially devastating affliction.

Available on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2NPNy84

 

So many cultures have folk traditions revolving around warding off the evil eye that in 2018 it was added as a universal emoji icon: 🧿.

For my readers, what was your biggest take-away from the book?