Blog Archives

A hymn to Sekhmet — The House of Vines

Sannion wrote this prayer for me — I love Sekhmet dearly and was made Her priest in 1995. That didn’t go away when I became Heathen. I venerate Her still and will so long as I draw breath. She brought me to Loki and Odin. We’ll be honoring Her as a House on Jan. 7, Her feast day. Dua.

For Galina Krasskova To Sekhmet the Protector Hail to you Sekhmet, Fierce Onewho can swat away the Seven Arrowswith a contemptuous wave of your hand,Sekhmet the Mighty One who hunts downmalignant, vagrant Spirits by day and by night,Sekhmet the Unrivaled One who spits at the Evil Eyerendering it as impotent as the enemies of the […]

A hymn to Sekhmet — The House of Vines

One Hundred Years Ago This Past November 4…

The tomb of the golden King was discovered. 

The Pharoah Tutankhamun was the younger brother or young son (1) of the heretic pharoah whose name I will not write (may his soul be devoured by Amit). The heretic was insane and attempted to force his one “god” on all of the Two Lands, and in doing so destroyed temples, persecuted the devout, and attempted to eradicate the indigenous polytheism of Egypt. He, the heretic, was a disgusting, mentally deranged, perverse, and morally corrupt fool who unfortunately ruled longer than he should have. Fortunately, Tutankhamun did not share the same perversity of belief. 

While Tutankhamun only ruled for eleven years (1332-23 B.C.E.), one of his earliest acts upon becoming Pharoah was the restoration of traditional cultus of the Gods. You can read the Stela of Restoration here. He also restored the capital to Thebes, abandoning the polluted city of Amarna which the heretic had built and to which he had moved the capital, and Tutankhamun also restored the holy festivals (2).

For this reason, this is a young man to whom I pay hero cultus and he is honored on part of my shrine given over partly to religious lineage dead and partly to polytheistic heroes and martyrs. It’s important to remember these men and women who fought for their Gods. All too often the narrative that we as polytheists are fed is one of supercessionism – i.e. “well, of course it was a natural “evolution” monotheism usurped polytheism.” This is bullshit. There was nothing inevitable or natural about this. We are told that the spread of monotheism wasn’t resisted. It was. We are told that it cannot be driven back. It can. Just because the world looks one way today does not mean that it cannot be different tomorrow. Men and women like Tutankhamun light the way for our own restoration. 

For those with children, there is a very sweet (3) children’s book that talks, in a gentle manner, about Tutankhamun’s restoration of the Gods. It’s called “Tutankhamun’s Gift”. I highly recommend it for younger readers. 

Affiliate advertising disclosure

Notes: 

  1. I’m not an Egyptologist. I haven’t kept up on the debates. I *think* opinion has shifted to him being the son of the heretic, but I’m not sure. I know when I first learned about him, the majority opinion was that he was the son of Amenhotep III. 
  2. Apparently, Tutankhamun was revered as a living God during his lifetime, and even petitioned as a deified king, something usually done only when the Pharoah had passed. See Booth, Charlotte (2007). The Boy Behind the Mask: Meeting the Real Tutankhamun, p. 120. This shouldn’t be surprising. He restored the sacral link between his people, his land, and the Gods, something his heretic relative, possibly father, had shat upon. 
  3. Though the book is dated if current scholarship places Tutankhamun as the son and not brother of the heretic. 

Recently Commissioned Prayer for Khonsu

I’m posting this to share a prayer to the Kemetic God of the moon, Khonsu, that C.C. recently commissioned from me.

Prayer to Khonsu
By Galina Krasskova


(if possible, begin by lighting a bit of incense)

I praise the God of the Moon, 
Keeper of Night, Khonsu (dua!*).
I praise the God of the Moon,
most Holy Traveler,
Who marks the passage of time, 
blessing each moment of our lives. 
We dream under Your blessed gaze, 
and Your hands brought us into being, 
with craft, care, and magic. 
Dua! You Who are our Pathfinder, 
You have filled us with magic too. 

Be our Defender, oh sweet God of night. 
Keep us safe as we sleep and dream. 
Illuminate the darkness and protect us, 
Oh great Healer, as only You can. 
Protect us against malefica, against sickness, 
against evil spirits, evil tongues, and evil thoughts.
Protect us please, against vicious animals, 
against injury, and the peril of sudden death. 
Make our sleep restful and relief giving, 
that we may rise refreshed to praise You again. 

You, Khonsu, are the wise serpent 
Who fertilized the egg of the world, 
setting creation in motion. 
Let us dream for ourselves a better fate 
than that with which we were born. 
Teach us the power of transformation, 
the trick of the serpent shedding his skin, 
that we too may be born anew, 
each day upon awaking. 

Son of Mut, Son of Amun
Friend and Companion of Thoth,
You protect the order the Gods have decreed. 
May my tongue ever praise You. 
May my heart ever find joy in Your service. 
Dua! Most Holy God
May I ever find favor in Your sight. 
Hail to You, Lord Khonsu.  



*This Kemetic word is an expression of both gratitude and praise. 
Copyright 2021 G. Krasskova 

20% Off Sale About to End

I am running a 20% OFF sale on all art, books, bookmarks, and prayer cards in my etsy shop Wyrd Curiosities through January 31, 2021. Use this code to redeem: TGI2021 (or click the link). There’s more than 300 prayer cards available for our Gods and Goddesses across a range of polytheistic traditions: Norse, Germanic, Celtic, Gaulic, Welsh, Roman, Greek, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, and so much more.

Yuletide Shopping Guide – Egyptian Products – Part 2

I created the Yuletide Shopping Guide in part because Yule is one of my favorite times of year. The guide features items polytheists would enjoy seeing in their homes or under their tree this yuletide. All with the hope of spreading some holiday cheer in a difficult year by finding items that can help feed our devotions within our polytheistic traditions, but also to hopefully along the way lift up some of the artisans in our midst too. So far I’ve included resources for crafters, makers, and DIYers: cookie cutters, crafting molds, fabric (MesoamericanEgyptianGreekNorthern Europe), machine embroidery designs, cross-stitch and embroidery patterns, as well as knitting and crochet patterns. I’ve also highlighted some items on a Krampus theme. I’ve spotlighted items you can use to deck the halls and trim the tree. 

Greco-Roman themed products relevant to devotees of Cultus Deorum and Hellenismos. There were some artists and artisans who offered a range of product across pantheons, or whose work focuses on a tradition that I didn’t have enough items to spotlight on it’s own. So I highly recommend that you carefully peruse the spotlighted artists and artisans in my miscellaneous Part 1, & Part 2. You will find offerings encompassing a vast array of traditions: Norse, Slavic, Celtic, Roman, Greek, Egyptian, Hindu, Polynesian, Mesoamerican, Minoan, Assyrian, Sumerian, Welsh, Asian, Native American/Inuit, and more!

Yesterday, I featured the first installment of products relevant for devotees of Kemetism (Egyptian Polytheism). Today I will be sharing with you the second installment of goods.

DeeEgypt

Based in the Dallas/Fort Worth area in Texas, DeeEgypt is a shop that sells everything Egyptian, with a lot of jewelry, deity statuary and more. Items range from cheaply made reproductions, to more unique and premium products. There’s a few items that I feel are extra special: a Bastet sistrum, a hand-painted brass and copper altar with depictions of various deities (including Isis, Osiris, Horus, Set), a Thoth clock, a wooden carved gods boat, and an Anubis tealight oil burner.


WeEgyptians

SummitCollection’s WeEgyptians are hand painted cold cast resin figures of the Kemetic Gods and Goddesses, as well as a few other items related to ancient Egyptian culture. The artistic style of these figures would appeal to most children.


Miscellaneous


Thanks to the antiquities housed within the collections of museums around the world, you can find a range of items from books, scarves, stationary, toys, statuary, jewelry and more in museum gift shops.

Metropolitan Museum Gift Shop

New York’s Metropolitan Museum Gift Shop has an array of goodies on offer: Horus jewelry with earrings and a coordinating necklace. Plus this Horus enamel pin makes a great stocking stuffer too! Looking for something for the kids? How about some huggable Gods to be their protector and friend! You can find both Bastet and Anubis plush toy.

British Museum Gift Shop

The British Museum Gift Shop has the same Anubis, and Bastet plush toys that the New York’s Metropolitan Museum also offers. There’s a hippopotamus (an animal sacred to Tarewet) ornament , and there’s a cat (an animal sacred to Bastet) ornament. You can find a range of statuary, but these pewter statues of Anubis, Horus, Osiris and Bastet are affordable. There’s also a blue Bes statue and Bastet Bookends. Plus even more in their shop.


Next up are products of interest for Northern Tradition polytheism. Until then make sure to peruse the previous entries in the Yuletide Shopping Guide as there is a range of items relevant to Kemetics scattered throughout.

Yuletide Shopping Guide – Egyptian Products – Part 1

I created the Yuletide Shopping Guide in part because Yule is one of my favorite times of year. The guide features items polytheists would enjoy seeing in their homes or under their tree this yuletide. All with the hope of spreading some holiday cheer in a difficult year by finding items that can help feed our devotions within our polytheistic traditions, but also to hopefully along the way lift up some of the artisans in our midst too. So far I’ve included resources for crafters, makers, and DIYers: cookie cutters, crafting molds, fabric (MesoamericanEgyptianGreekNorthern Europe), machine embroidery designs, cross-stitch and embroidery patterns, as well as knitting and crochet patterns. I’ve also highlighted some items on a Krampus theme. I’ve spotlighted items you can use to deck the halls and trim the tree. 

Greco-Roman themed products relevant to devotees of Cultus Deorum and Hellenismos. There were some artists and artisans who offered a range of product across pantheons, or whose work focuses on a tradition that I didn’t have enough items to spotlight on it’s own. So I highly recommend that you carefully peruse the spotlighted artists and artisans in my miscellaneous Part 1, & Part 2. You will find offerings encompassing a vast array of traditions: Norse, Slavic, Celtic, Roman, Greek, Egyptian, Hindu, Polynesian, Mesoamerican, Minoan, Assyrian, Sumerian, Welsh, Asian, Native American/Inuit, and more!

Today I’ll be featuring the first installment of products relevant for devotees of Kemetism (Egyptian Polytheism).

deBaunFineCeramics

DeBaunFineCeramics has a selection of offering bowls, shrines, pendants, incense burners and more.


TutsTreasures

TutsTreasures offers Kemetic Deity altar icons, prayer beads, and candles.


ShadowOfTheSphinx

ShadowOfTheSphinx offers handcrafted altar statues and amulets of ancient Egypt.


AncientWaresShop

AncientWaresShop features embossed metal worked depictions of Anubis, and the Eye of Horus, as well as wood burned coasters with lotuses, ankh, etc.


Saiyre

Saiyre has metal enameled lapel pins depicting Sekhmet, Bastet, and Anubis. Small, stylish and affordable these would be perfect for a stocking stuffer.


There’s more items to come in the Yuletide Shopping Guide, including MORE Egyptian products. Until then make sure to peruse the previous entries in the Yuletide Shopping Guide as there is a range of items relevant to Kemetics.

Yuletide Shopping Guide – Artists and Artisans Part 2

I created the Yuletide Shopping Guide in part because Yule is one of my favorite times of year. The guide features items polytheists would enjoy seeing in their homes or under their tree this yuletide. All with the hope of both spreading some holiday cheer in a difficult year, but also to hopefully lift up some of the artisans in our midst too. So far I’ve included resources for crafters, makers, and DIYers: cookie cutters, crafting molds, fabric (Mesoamerican, Egyptian, Greek, Northern Europe), machine embroidery designs, cross-stitch and embroidery patterns, as well as knitting and crochet patterns. I’ve also highlighted some items on a Krampus theme. I’ve spotlighted items you can use to deck the halls and trim the tree. Now I am spotlighting artists, artisans and the goods they make: Part 1, and Part 2 is today. Stay tuned, because there’s still more to come.


TrueCraftWorks

TrueCraftworks is run by a USA based leather-worker that offers in addition to jewelry and guitar straps, purses, boxes designed to hold cards (or if you wanted to runes), leather wallets/card holders, coasters and more.

Leather artisan goods from TrueCraftWorks

Emily Balivet

Emily Balivet is a talented artist whose brightly colored works encompass pagan and polytheistic themes ranging from tarot, to various Goddesses (Egyptian, Greek, Norse, Celtic, Hindu and more). Her shop features the prismatically vivid colors of both original paintings, and reproduction prints of her work.

Emily Balivet’s art depicting various deities.

KatLunoeArt

KatLunoeArt is the online shop for oil painter and illustrator Kat, whose work has graced book covers and other special projects. She currently has a small collection of various deity art available.  

Deity illustrations from KatLunoeArt

Anetteprs

Anetteprs is the etsy storefront for artist Anette Pirso. She focuses her artwork around various polytheistic traditions, including Gods and Goddesses (mainly Goddesses). Some of her artwork has been used in clothing designs offered at Valhyr. She has a large selection of both Norse and Greek Goddesses, and an expanding selection of other goddesses from around the world: African, Mesoamerican, Egyptian, Native American & Inuit, Slavic, Celtic, Asian, Polynesian, and Hindu. In addition to her artistic prints of these Goddesses, she also has a few artistic depictions of impactful women in history. She recently started offering waterproof stickers too (great for use on cars, water bottles, etc.). She has made the commitment that 5% of each purchase is donated to a The Estonian Women’s Shelters Union, which helps women who have been the victims of domestic violence.

Goddess illustrations by Anette Pirso

OlivosArtStudio

OlivosArtStudio is the online shop for painter Claudia Olivos whose depictions of Goddesses range from all over the globe: Egyptian, Greek, Hindu, Minoan, Norse, Mesoamerican (various traditions), Polynesian, and so much more.

Goddess illustrations from Claudia Olivos

SilvaTamayo

SilvaTamayo is the online storefront for paper artist Mary Carmen Silva Tamayo specializing in Mesoamerican and Mexican art, including depictions of Aztec deities.

Paper artwork creations from Mary Carmen Silva Tamayo

Yuletide Shopping Guide – Knitting & Crochet Patterns

Makers, crafters and DIYers I have been spotlighting in my Yuletide Shopping Guide resources to help you create items related to polytheistic religious traditions. So far that has included cookie cutterscraft molds, and fabric related to MesoamericaAncient EgyptAncient Greece and Ancient Northern Europe. I’m shared machine embroidery design files, cross-stitch and embroidery patterns, and today I have knitting and crochet patterns (including amigurumi) to share.

Not all patterns below are depicted.

Please let me know if there are any errors, with all the copy/pasting it is easy to make a mistake. If there’s something you think I should spotlight in the yuletide shopping guide, please contact me and let me know. So concludes our fabric resources, but there will be more resources to come! Stay tuned.

Yuletide Shopping Guide – Cross-stitch and Embroidery Patterns

Makers, crafters and DIYers I have been spotlighting in my Yuletide Shopping Guide resources to help you create items related to polytheistic religious traditions. So far that has included cookie cutterscraft molds, and fabric related to MesoamericaAncient EgyptAncient Greece and Ancient Northern Europe. I’ve shared machine embroidery design files, and today I’ve got needlepoint in the form of cross-stitch and embroidery patterns.

Not all patterns are depicted above.

Norse

Egyptian

Miscellaneous


Please let me know if there are any errors, with all the copy/pasting it is easy to make a mistake. If there’s something you think I should spotlight in the yuletide shopping guide, please contact me and let me know. So concludes our fabric resources, but there will be more resources to come! Stay tuned.

Yuletide Shopping Guide – Fabric – Egyptian

Recently I posted that because 2020 has been a challenging year I was putting together a Yuletide Shopping Guide with the intent to help artisan members of our community & to help spotlight items that support our religious devotions and practices. Starting with resources for our crafters, makers and DIYers. So far I’ve spotlighted cookie cutterscraft molds and fabric with Mesoamerican connections.

Pay attention to the product listings, as there are multiple options for fabric, sometimes options for wallpaper. For those who aren’t crafty, sometimes there’s also options for purchasing finished goods (tablecloths, pillowcases, curtains and more) made with the fabric pattern.

In some ways Kemetics are incredibly fortunate in the amount of surviving historical sources from both the archaeological record and ancient manuscripts. There is so much rich artistic depictions already existing for the Gods and Goddesses of their pantheon. Some of these fabrics are direct inspiration and variations of those ancient sources, but some are creative nods and touches to the past.


Pennycandy

Pennycandy has a small pattern collection with different variations of hieroglyphics, accompanied by a range of coordinating fabric patterns including a lotus motif.


Marchhare

Marchhare features some really great children’s designs of the Egyptian Gods (Isis, Bastet, Ma’at, Horus, Osiris, Anubis, and Hathor) altogether in one adorable pattern, or individually in a cut-and-sew plushie style.


Raveneve

Raveneve offers an array of colorful prints inspired from Egyptian archaeology. Among the patterns you can find gods featured such as Anubis, Mut, Ma’at, Amun, Thoth, Osiris, Horus and more. There’s far more patterns than what you see represented here. The shop link (above) will take you to all the artist’s Egyptian themed fabrics, except for the Bastet design.


Pond Ripple

Pond Ripple offers a selection of Egyptian themed fabrics, including some fabric patterns where you can find featured Isis, Horus, Anubis, and Ma’at. There’s also some renderings of geometric patterns, or connected animals to complement the Gods.


Rainjule

Rainjule has a variety of Egyptian themed fabrics, including patterns featuring Osiris, Isis, Nuit, Nephthys and Horus.


Milva Art

Designer Milva-art has a coordinating mini Egyptian fabric design collection. Among the patterns you can find Anubis, Thoth, Bastet, Horus and more. Plus there’s hieroglyphics, and an art deco inspired lotus pattern.


Wren Leyland

Wren_Leyland has a lotus pattern in a variety of sizes, and colors.  She also has another collection called Ancient Stone. In it there is Egyptian Hieroglyphics pattern in various colors. To find all the variants you’ll need to scroll through a few pages of the collection. And while not Egyptian, there is also a Sumerian cuneiform pattern in various colors too within the collection.


CJLDesigns

CJLDesigns has an Egyptian themed pattern collections with coordinating fabrics, many which would work great as borders, or used as stripes in projects.


Analinea

Designer Analinea presents to us a Lotus Motif in various colors and sizes, plus one variant with the scarab.


LouiseHenderson

LouiseHenderson gives us a couple of options with Isis and Anubis, as well as another ancient Egyptian themed fabric with Horus spotlighted too.


Miscellaneous Designs

In addition to the artist fabric collections above, we also have a number of other designs by artists too.


There were numerous links and a bunch of copy/pasting, so please let me know if somehow I made a mistake. If there’s something you think I should spotlight in the yuletide shopping guide, please contact me and let me know. Up next, even MORE fabric resources for DIYers.