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July for Loki – For Loki, Friend of Odin

for Loki, Friend of Odin

He Who battles alongside His friends
maintains the strength of Asgard,
using His gifts to challenge the giants, 
using His body to subvert Svaðilfari’s Master.
He pours treasure down upon His allies,
He rains wrath down upon His foes. 
His victory lies in the longest game,
and of all the Gods, not even He
knows its end. 
Bright as fire, slippery as a fish,
drenched in the well-bright, whispered warnings, 
this God comes. He challenges everything, 
laughing around a bonfire encompassing even
His own destruction. 
He knows that with chaos
comes opportunity, 
to turn the final battle on its end,
to grab victory out of the maws of the wolf,
a celebration of blood and steel,
and those who think He lacks courage
know not what His courage has cost. 
Hail to You, Loki, friend of Thor, 
Who works Your wiles in Odin’s shadow
so the Old Man may shine all the more. 
Hail to the fighter Whose wit is a wound
deadlier than poison in the heart of Their enemies. 
May we always honor You, oh God Who finds the loops
in every loophole. Show us too how to be slippery
and hard to catch in the maze of things that would bind us
away from our Gods, stifle our devotion, and burden our hearts
with pollution. 

By G. Krasskova

excerpted from this book.

Affiliate advertising disclosure.

Lectio Divina: July 23, 2022

I haven’t done one of these in awhile so I thought, since yesterday was the anniversary of my Mani devotional, that I would look at one of the few references that we have in the lore pertaining to Mani. There really aren’t many and in some respects, that’s an incredible freedom in figuring out how to venerate Him. On the other side of that, I do wish we had just a bit more, a prayer, a hymn, something for Him because given how important agriculture and farming were to our ancestors, the House of Mundilfari must have had Their share of devotion, and more so than They receive today. We forget in our urban lives how important seasonal cycles – governed by Mani and Sunna – are to a farmer. 

Of course, that’s not how I personally connect to Mani (through farming or agricultural cycles) but it’s something I’ve come to recognize and respect over the years of my devotion to Him. Now, onto the reading. 

The passage I chose for today is from the Vafþrúðnismál stanza 23: 


"Mundilfari heitir, hann er mána faðir
ok svá Sólar it sama; 
himin hverfa þau skulu hverjan dag
öldum at ártali." (1)

He is called Turner of Time, He is Moon’s father
and also thusly of Sun (2);
They (dutifully) journey round the canopy of heaven every day
to determine for people the liturgical year (3).  

I do augury in the mornings and today’s message was that today is ok, but it’s one that will require patience in many little things, especially the early part of the day. That being said, I hope y’all will be patient with me as I pick my way through this verse. Also, I’m reading devotionally and to some degree theologically, not as a literature major. Do keep that in mind too! So, once I sat and translated this passage to the best of my ability, I noticed a few things. 

Firstly, the word “it” may at times imply a dual form, which means it refers to two of something. Some languages have special forms for a pair. Ancient Greek is like that, for instance. If you’re referring to a pair of something, the verb takes a special form. Modern English doesn’t have a form like this. We would just use second- or third-person plural depending on the grammatical case required. If I’ve interpreted this correctly, then it stands out for me. When I read this, that use of the dual, while absolutely grammatically correct also creates a unique connection linking Mani and Sunna.  They are a pair; They work together; and devotionally, I have to say this is true. When I think of One, the Other is not usually far behind in my thoughts. When I engage devotionally with One of Them, I often sense in my soul, echoes of the Other far more so than with any of the Other Powers Whom I venerate. While the lore doesn’t say anything about it, I’ve often assumed that They are twins. Regardless, They work hand in hand and the holiness, goodness, and journey of One reinforces the same in the Other (4).

The word himin or ‘heaven’ may actually be translated as “canopy of heaven” which immediately brings to mind, not the heaven of Christian religion but the dome of Ymir’s skull, the gleaming circlet that formed the space-making division between sky and land. When the three creator Gods Oðinn, Hoenir, and Loður slew Their primordial ancestor Ymir, They skillfully formed the scaffolding, the framework of creation with his blood, bones, and viscera. From Ymir’s skull these Gods created the vault of heaven, the sky, the galaxy, the cosmos – all that is above us. The verb skulu denotes obligation and duty (it’s where the third Norn Skuld gets Her name. In the case of skulu though, Cleasby/Vigfusson notes that it carries a relatively positive connotation), so here one might read it that “they must journey everyday around the canopy of heaven.” The word “at” when connected to a verb of motion carries a sense of traveling around the borders of a space or thing (5). So, Mani and Sunna each day have the duty of traversing or circumnavigating the great vault of heaven, the canopy of Ymir’s skull. In doing so, They are reinforcing creation, reifying the moment the three Creator Gods brought the whole structure into being and set it in motion.  That means that Mani and Sunna, and by extension the House of Mundilfari, are absolutely essential cosmologically to creation, the ongoing sustenance of that creation, and the fabric of being. 

Moreover, the text reads that they are doing this to determine for the people —öldum (6), that is humanity, ártali, not “fate” as I have seen several translations render this passage, but the cycle of the year. I would go so far as to say the liturgical year. This word can be used poetically as a gloss for the Moon, specifically because the Heathen year was partly lunar (7). This makes sense agriculturally– and we have a lot of folklore in Germany, England, Appalachia, and amongst the PA Deutsch about planting according to the phase and/or sign of the moon. Likewise, there are names are given to each month’s moon that often tie into the month’s agricultural happenings, and while the winter and summer solstice are important liturgically, so are the autumnal and vernal equinoxes. Here is an interesting article that mentions why so many calendars are “luni-solar”. Basically, both Mani and Sunna play Their part. 

Despite being something of a misanthrope, I think it’s important to note that humanity is mentioned in this cosmological equation too. It is for the good of humanity that the cosmic cycles are thus delineated. We were created, carefully crafted. Our place in the architecture of the worlds was not an accident. Of course, neither are we at the apex of that architecture and piety demands that we know our place to be one of reverence for the Powers, but we matter to our Gods. We matter to our Gods, and They continually bless us in ways large and small and have from the beginning. 

The next question I ask myself when reading something like this, after looking at the words in both English and ON is this: what do I do with this? What impact will I allow this knowledge to have on my devotional practice. Every word in this passage has opened up a world and we have so little written on our Gods, especially those in the House of Mundilfari, that each word is a treasure. 

Notes: 

  1. I snagged the Old Norse text from this site. The English translations are mine unless otherwise noted. 
  2. My translation. Dutifully is implied in the use of the it. My Old Norse is pretty basic, but I have to disagree with many of the translations I have read. The translation is usually given “flaming sun” and to the best I can determine, there is just nothing in this sentence to indicate that there is any attribute of Sunna mentioned, other than that of being Mundilfari’s daughter. 
  3. “Sol” is another name for Sunna. Sunna seems to be the more poetic form of Her name. I personally prefer “Sunna”. See entry here. There’s a very interesting note in the Cleasby/Vifusson definition that in Iceland children would greet the sun every morning. If this is a hold-over from Heathen times, which it reads as though it is, then it further reinforces the cosmological importance of the House of Mundilfari in our tradition. 
  4. I never connected Sunna to holiness in quite the way that I do now until I watched an historical special with historian Ruth Goodman. I think it was either her Tudor Farm series or Edwardian Farm series. I can’t recall. What I do recall is that she was showing how a traditional dairy worked and noted that the wife or dairy maids would not only scrub out the churns and other vessels but would let them dry in the sun because it sanitized them. The sun brings wholeness and healing, but also purification. It opened up an entire avenue of exploration for me in how I honor Her, in meditations, and even offerings. 
  5. See Cleasby/Vigfusson here.
  6. From the noun alda, which in poetry can mean “people.”
  7. See Cleasby/Vigfusson here.

Bookversary: Dancing in the House of the Moon

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First published in 2014, today is the bookversary for my devotional to Mani, Dancing in the House of the Moon.

Dancing in the House of the Moon is a celebration and adoration of the Norse Moon God Mani. It is a collection of essays, prayers and poems ­ word­-pictures­ that summon a sense of His presence: ineffable, incandescent, and beautiful. This is a devotional for anyone wishing to know this God better, anyone who has tasted of the splendor of Mani, anyone wishing to throw themselves into His devotion. It is the expression of a cultus renewed and restored for the modern world.”

Add it to your shelves via amazon.

Bookversary: to Rejuvenate and Nourish

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Released on this day in 2016.

“To Rejuvenate and Nourish” is a novena booklet to the Greek God of Healing, Asklepios. It provides an introduction about this God and nine days of prayers in His honor.”

Have you added this to your library?

Available on amazon.

A passel of prayers for Loki

July 8

When I paint, I think of You, oh my God. 
I think of Your skill as craftsman and creator. 
As Loður with Your Brothers, 
You brought worlds into being, 
You changed the balance of creation, 
and when You and Your Brothers found trees
ash and elm, on the border of the holy marsh, 
You enlivened their existence – gifted to Them 
by You and Your brothers – with color, heat, 
with hunger, hungers of all the senses, 
and an appreciate of beauty. 
It can lift our souls up to You and the other Powers,
if we allow it, if we throw ourselves into its embrace
as hungrily as You did the making of our souls. 
Hail to You, oh Loki, Architect of our hearts, 
Architect of our being. 


July 9

Dumezil called you the unquiet thought
and I think You are that, and You inspire that, 
in those who venerate You. 
Satisfaction leads ever to the next holy task, 
the next project, the next prayer, the next 
whisper of devotion. 
You did more in those moments, 
after the words were first made
 than simply gift us with the pumping of our blood, 
all the beautiful shades of our skin, and the blessing
of our sensorium. You did so very much more. 
You made space in our hearts and filled it with longing
for the Gods, for You, love, and longing, 
a hunger for the Gods as deep and abiding 
as Your hunger for experience, for knowledge, for movement
that ever drives back destruction. 
Only with Sigyn do You find peace. 
Only with Her are You truly home. 
Hail to You, oh wondrous Power. 
Hail to You, Loki. 

 
July 10


Your cleverness got me through very difficult times, oh God. 
Wit and wonder, wry humor, and a talent 
for inventing the means for survival, when none at all 
previously existed saw me through and raised me up. 
For that, and for so much more, I am grateful. 
There is not a single thing in my world, 
not a single thing I treasure, 
not a single thing of true and abiding goodness and joy
(including my relationship with Odin) 
that did not pass in some way through Your hands. 
Thank you. They are small words but every atom of my being
exhales them every moment of every day in gratitude to You, 
my gracious and loving God, and my Protector. 
Hail to You, Loki. 


July 11

There are days that are exhausting and stressful, 
irritating, angering, and sometimes just plain bad. 
Today was one of those days, but even at its worst, 
and today was just annoying, not the worst by any means, 
when I sit down to pray, and turn my attention to You, 
and to the other Gods, then the day is radiant and good
for nothing is better than speaking Your holy names
a sacred litany, and rooting myself in the grace 
of Your presence. 
Hail to You, oh Loki, always. 

My photo, a window in Phoenicia, NY. there’s something about the delightful kaleidoscope of light and color that reminds me of Loki and the way He restores and renews the way I look at the world.

2 for Loki


For Loki – July 6, 2022

Three things I ask of You, my God. 
That I may always love You, 
That I may love You well, 
And that Your name never be absent from my heart. 
Hail Loki, Who fuels the fire of devotion. 


For Loki – July 7, 2022

You have never flinched from the cost of Your words and deeds. 
You paid the cost and in doing so, won glorious gifts for all the Gods. 
Because of You, Thor has Mjolnir. 
Because of You, Odin has Gungnir. 
Because of You, Freyr has Skiðblaðnir.
Because of You, Odin has Draupnir. 
Because of You, Freyr has Gullinbursti. 
Because of You, Sif of course, has everlasting golden and glorious hair.
Because of You, the Treasures of the Gods were brought into being, 
by Brokk, Eitri, and the Sons of Ivaldi. 
You suffered for this and more, 
yet these treasures exist, ever in the hands of the Gods;
and these treasures protect the worlds.
Hail to You, Loki, now and always. 
Snaptun Loki

Bookversary: In Love’s Winged Harbor

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Today is the bookversary, the second in fact, for a devotional I published to Anteros during the first year of the pandemic.

“Son of Aphrodite and Ares, member of the Erotes – divine manifestations of love – and God especially of requited love, Anteros has received little attention from modern polytheists until now. With this heartfelt devotional, Galina Krasskova introduces the reader to Anteros and offers a nine-day ritual of prayer and worship for Him. Giving honor to Anteros can lead to a deeper connection in our spiritual lives as a whole. As Krasskova writes, “Love must be given and received and doing so ennobles, lifts us up, and opens us up to the Gods.”

Do you have a copy? You can find it on amazon.

For Loki – Day 3

Loki by John Bauer 1911

Yesterday, a friend called you “Kinsman of the Unquiet Thought”
and I recall something similar was my mother’s favorite heiti for You. 
It encapsulates Your sneakiness, and it is not deceit as so many claim, 
to keep us aware and on our toes. It is a grace, gift, and kindness.
Let us ever and always be “unquiet” too, lest complacency smother
our devotion. 

Hail to You, Loki, enemy of Acedia.
Hail Hugreynandi Hoenis, Tester of Hoenir, 
You test us as well, to make us stronger, 
to make us better, to root us in courage, 
confidence, and piety. 
We grow under Your caring hands,
whether we would or not; 
and our worlds expand
as the worlds expanded in the beginning of time,
under the will of You and Your brothers, 
and Your capable hands. 
Hail Holy One.

Hail Loki – Day 2

You, oh God, were the comfort of my youth, 
my strength in times of weakness, 
my salvation when I otherwise would have been lost. 
You held my head above the waters of terror. 
You sustained me in isolation and poverty. 
There are no words that I can say; 
no gift that I lay at Your feet,
can ever equal the care and protection
that You gave me, all unasked. 

Ever will I eat the fire You proffer in Your hand, 
ever will I allow it to polish my heart, to anneal it,  
to transform it into a gleaming anvil, 
upon which You may hammer out
the contrapunto of Your desire. 
I will always be grateful for the gifts You have given me;
and ever and always will I praise You. 
I will lay gifts at your feet every day of my life. 
I will make thousands of offerings, as many as I can,
always and ever in joy, and always to You,
before my time here is done.

Hail Loki, always. 
Arthur Rackham, Loki

July for Loki — one more time.

Ten years ago this year, I began celebrating Loki specifically in the month of July. It’s not that there aren’t other feast days for Him during the year, but July for a number of reasons, including the rising of the dog star Sirius, which is associated with Him, is a very potent month for His veneration. 

For awhile, a number of years actually, I would write a prayer for Loki every day from July 1-31, and I believe I was the first to make this commitment, but the last couple of years I haven’t done that. Instead, I’ve made offerings to Him and done my household devotions and gotten about my devotional life. Today, a friend reminded me that I’d started the July practice in 2012 – maybe even earlier. I’ve honored and loved Loki so long it seems like decades and decades -- and I thought maybe it was time to do this practice again. 
So here goes. 


For Loki on July 1

Slyest and most cunning of Gods, 
Laevisi Loki, Protector of our House, 
I hail You on this day, 
when the heat batters down upon us,
and auguries of birds whisper tales of 
Your clever might. 

Bölvasmiðr, Mischief-maker, 
better than any other God
at stirring up trouble, 
getting the necessary things accomplished, 
and shattering the walls we set around ourselves, 
I pray to You that our thought-worlds may never be small. 
May our devotion rage like a wildfire through all the many halls
and hazy turnings of the world we have created for ourselves,
until there is nowhere within our lives You have not been. 

God of fire and transformation, open us up via Your grace
to all the glories the Gods have made. 
Let us exalt and celebrate all that is Holy 
and when we are confronted by evil,
may it be Your maegen we call upon
to see us through. 

Hail to You, Loki, best-loved and ever honored
as every God should be, now and forever.  
Loki by A. Rackham