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Prayer to Sunna in Kenaz

I know this is a little belated, Sunwait having ended last week, but I just realized I’d forgotten to post this. This is the prayer we offered to invoke Sunna in our ritual last Friday.

Prayer to Sunna in Kenaz

by G. Krasskova

Tonight, on the last night of Sunwait, Mani gleams brightly in the sky, 
Luminous and bright. The air is chill, portending the coming of winter. 
The world glistens adorned with lights and greenery, a reminder
Of the blessings of yule to come. Tonight we hail Sunna. 

She comes awash in beauty, powerful, radiant. 
She comes with open hands showering Her blessings 
On every heart willing to receive them. 
She comes, generous and proud, joyous and fiery
Filled with the wisdom of a Goddess Who has seen
The worlds themselves created. 

Kenaz crowns Her, weaving itself through Her light, 
Opening the way to knowledge, wisdom, and well-being, 
Strengthening our hearts with courage,
Our minds and souls with devotion. 

Sunna is our guide and kenaz the fire She bears. 
It is illumination, sacral understanding, 
And the capacity to carry Mystery into the world. 
It is our light through the darkness, the dark night of the soul,
The darkness of our world. May we tend it well and joyously 
Knowing that no matter how grim the night
Sunna and Her retinue will always come
And Her presence alone, drives back  darkness. 

Hail to You,  Gladness of the Heavens. 
Hail to You, Oh Sunna, on this, 
The sixth week of Sunwait. 

Sunwait week five: Sunna in Raido

I realized today that I had forgotten to post about week five of Sunwait. It’s gone quickly this year — I can hardly believe we’re less than two weeks away from Modranacht. So, before I let this go any longer, here is the prayer we used in Friday night’s ritual. We spent a great deal of time sitting in the ritual space during this rite, sharing a horn, and praising our Gods and ancestors and reaped the fruit of that, I think, in the beautiful Lussanatr rite in which we participated last night. Truly our Gods are so incredibly good to us and never cease bestowing Their blessings.

Prayer to Sunna coming in Raido

(By G. Krasskova)

Hail to You, Glorious Goddess of the Sun, 
Coming with fiery momentum,
Driving back darkness
Driving back entropy
Driving back fear. 
We praise You, 
And Your shining retinue. 

Hail to You, Sunna, 
A mighty force, 
Against which no malefic power may stand. 
You are our pace setter, 
And under Your guidance, we shall not falter. 
You sustain us, Great One, 
When all hope seems lost. 
You open the way for us, 
When we cannot move forward. 
In love and praise we bow our heads before You,
For You sustained our people age after age. 

May Your blessings fall upon all right minded people, 
Blessings of protection, ferocious love, abundance, and health. 
May we never doubt that we live nestled in Your protection, 
For Your skills are mighty, and the equal of many a battle god. 

Hail to Sunna, riding and unstoppable, in raido. 
Hai Goddess of the Sun. 


The Fourth Week of Sunwait: Sunna in Ansuz

We had a lovely Sunwait rite tonight. I can already feel the momentum building as we move one week closer to Yule and it evokes such anticipation in me to submit myself to the dark and velvety magic of my God, the feel of His presence and those other Holy Powers we will invoke that I can barely hold it in. I want to garb myself in bells and a savage mask and run riot through the all too civilized and calm streets of my town, beating on doors and whirling as I chase the dark fire of my God. Instead, I’m here, writing this, holding these things in my heart, and contemplating the Yule cycle. 

This year, we are adding Lussinatt to our Yule celebrations. Christians may hold this night sacred to St. Lucy, and that’s cool, but it’s also an older holiday, honoring a much older Power. Incorporating this into our preparations for Yule is one more way of restoring and reclaiming our ritual cycle. I have promised myself (and my Vanic oriented assistant) that I will spend the winter hunting up hints at smaller holy days between the spring equinox and summer solstice so that we might balance our rites to the Gods of the holy days of winter, with equal attention given to those in summer. Back to tonight’s Sunwait though. 

We did a very simple symbel, passing the horn in rounds: the first honoring our Gods, the second, our ancestors, and the third an open round (we mostly honored other spirits, like the house and land vaettir that we regularly include in our venerations). Ansuz was galdred, Sunna was hailed (not in that order!) and it was a quiet and lovely ritual. 

Here is a close up of our altar. This Sunna statue was a gift from my husband last year. I absolutely love it. 

Close up of December 3, 2021 Sunwait altar

Here’s along view of the altar – my ancestor room is our ritual room, so that’s a line of ancestors and other ancestral spirits that we honor (the two main ancestor shrines are on other side of the table that you see here with the Sunwait altar). The cloth is one that I made just for this Sunwait (I still have to put edging on one side – the lace I wanted to use was late coming in!).

longer view of our week 4 Sunwait altar (with the line of ancestors at the bottom)

This is the prayer we offered tonight: 

Sunwait Prayer to Sunna in Ansuz


Hail to the glorious warrior Who rushes across the sky, 
magnificent, fierce, unstoppable in Her joy. 

Hail to She Who restores, Whose very presence
Banishes evil and malignancy. 

Hail to the Goddess Who emblazons the night, 
Filling the worlds with color and life.

Hail to the Felicitous One, Who elevates our souls, 
freeing us from the fetters of our enemies. 

Hail to the Companion of Mani, Beloved of Glenr, 
She Who stands as a shield against turpitude.

Hail to the Fiery Grace-Giver, 
She Who ever upholds the Worlds. 

Hail to the Laughing Brightness of the Heavens, 
Who with a gesture frees us from duress.

Hail to Sol, Gleaming Splendor, 
opening the way between the worlds. 

Hail to Sunna, ever triumphant, 
Ever generous with Her blessings. 

Hail to You Sunna as you ride in ansuz, 
Hail to You, on this fourth week of Sunwait. 

(by Galina Krasskova)

And finally, here’s another close up. 

Another Close up of tonight’s altar. All photos by G. Krasskova.

(Sannion wrote about tonight’s right over at House of Vines).

Third Week of Sunwait

The photo is of our shrine, the three small glasses are for our ancestors.

This is the prayer we used in our rite:

Sunwait Shrine, photo by G. Krasskova
Hail to Sunna
rising mighty in the rune Thurisaz. 
Hail to this Goddess Who wards off evil, 
Who banishes wickedness, 
Who purifies with light and fire
and the resonance of Her glory. 

Hail to Sunna, heaven's warrior
blazing across the sky
banishing the ichor of the outer darkness, 
of ignorance, of fear-
raising us up by Her very brightness. 

There is no foe we need fear, oh Goddess,
With Your shield and sword at our backs. 
You, blazing daughter of Mundilfari, 
are the best protection against peril
and we bow our heads before You, 
Glorious One. 

Hail to You, oh Goddess Sunna, on this third week of Sunwait, 
and hail the rune thurisaz. 

Second Week of Sunwait

We had our ritual for the second week of Sunwait last night and it was beautiful. Here is a picture of the shrine and here is the prayer we used to call Sunna in all Her glory. 

Prayer to Sunna in Uruz
By Galina Krasskova


The night after Your Brother’s magic, after His glory, His beauty shown forth in a magnificent eclipse You come. 

Sweeping graciously through our world, swathed in glory of Your own, You come. 

Bringing healing, strength, and restoration, You come, and our world is made new again. 

Oh Goddess of Glory, Brightest Power in the heavenly firmament, 
Smile down upon us and extend Your healing hands. 
Bless us in body and soul that we may stand rightly before our Gods. 

Oh Goddess of Glory, Whose power is enormous, unyielding, endlessly energizing, 
Whose power fills every vein of every leaf with vitality,
Whose glance ensures life and bounty,
Whose Mysteries are those of renewal and health,
Fill our hearts with Your incandescence, we pray. 

Oh Goddess of Blazing Glory, Yours is the Strength of ordering the worlds, 
Always within their cosmic courses. Do not turn Your face away from us. 
Whether near or far You ride across Midgard, always shall we venerate You. 

Hail to You, Gracious Glory. Hail to You, Sunna. 

Sunwait shrine with blessing bowl full of liquor, Sunwait candles, and Sunna image. photo by G. Krasskova

First Night of Sunwait

We held our first Sunwait ritual for this coming Jul just a couple of hours ago. It was simple but fulfilling. I know that I will be meditating on Fehu and its blessings, Sunna and Her blessings and the way that She is able to work through the lens of fehu as I move throughout this coming week. As an aside, I spent the last several months trying to get my ancestor and ritual room in order. It took a long time and a lot of labor but I completely reworked the room and now we have a really beautiful ritual space. This was the first formal rite that we held in our new space. Anyway, here is a picture of our shrine (or part of it) and the prayer that I wrote for tonight’s rite.

Sunwait Fehu Week – Prayer to Sunna
(By Galina Krasskova)

Life giver, beloved of the earth, of Erda, beloved of all those who work the earth, and of all those spirits inhabiting it, who depend upon Your generosity, who look up to You in hope and pleasure: oh Sunna, we praise You. 

Your might brings healing, and You stand with Your mighty kin
maintaining balance in the world, sustaining the Tree, its holy architecture,
each of the nine worlds, bringing joy and growth and protection to all who gaze upon You. 

Your husband Glenr delights in Your glory, parting the clouds 
as You make Your daily transit across the sky, allowing all to see and feel
the warm bounty of Your presence. 

You ride, unrestrained, fierce, exhilarated, counting the circuits of Your fiery horses,
and counting the days of each man, woman, and child, blessing Them with Your light. 

You are brilliant, and the Aesir call You All-Shining, the Jotnar, Everglowing, the Alfar, Lovely Wheel, and the Duergar, Dvalinn’s deluder. None are able to match the fleetness of Your steeds, 
or the ferocious glee of Your passage. You are the fire that delights both sky and air. 

You keep us honest, Lady Sunna, and inspire us to excellence. When we heed Your counsel and accept Your blessings, our lives are filled with joy, health, and luck. 

You begin Your daily journey washed in the light of the grey-clad moon, Your brother Mani, the two of You so radiant even the other Gods can hardly look upon Your glory. Day Star, Fair-Wheel, Graceful Shining, Red hued Goddess, mighty warrior, fair in Your blessings, joyful One: by all of these names and more we praise You. 

Bless our farmers, Great Goddess, we pray, and the food that we eat, and the lives that we lead, looking always to You as the guard and guide of our luck, our world, and our blessings. 

Hail to You, Sunna, on this first night of Sunwait. 

Sunwait Week 1 Glimpse of Sunna’s shrine by G. Krasskova

Getting Ready for Sunwait 2021

I must confess. For years, when I first learned about Sunwait, I handled it about the same way that (also for years) I handled the existence in my town of Kennedy’s Fried Chicken. I was wrong (on both counts). Hear me out. LOL. 

When I moved to my town in 2009, there was — and still is– a Kennedy’s Fried Chicken on our main street. I laughed about it and called it a knock-off of Kentucky Fried Chicken and thought no more about it, save that I’d snicker occasionally when I drove by. Well, a few months ago it was almost midnight, I didn’t feel like cooking, and we were hungry for chicken. The only thing open was Kennedy’s. I broke down and tried them and… OH MY GODS had I been missing out. The food was really good, and the service fantastic. Moreover, since it’s also halal, I suspect a ton more care goes into the selection of the meat than at the better-known KFC. I was forced to eat crow …and a metric ton of chicken. Ha ha. My experience with Sunwait was much the same…minus the chicken. 

I poo pooed it for years as a knock-off of Advent. Then, last year, my household decided to keep the Sunwait cycle. I don’t remember now why we suddenly decided to give it a shot. I think a friend of mine had mentioned her own family preparations for it on twitter and since I respect her, I thought that maybe I’d see what it was all about too. It was amazing. It completely transformed the way we approach Yule. Once again, I was forced to (metaphorically) eat crow. All of this had been completely unexpected too. 

The thing that I found so remarkable was how well it prepared us for the Yule season. We eased ever so gently through the weeks preceding Yule into the full dark wonder and mystery of this holy tide. By the time Modranacht (Mother Night, the night before Yule proper) finally arrived, we were already in the head and heart space to enter into the rites and rituals fully and with much greater understanding than in any previous year. I was just shocked. 

It really made me think about how many of our holy days, feast days, ritual cycles have gotten lost in the [forced—never forget that] conversion of our ancestors, in the flow of time, in the rank secularism of modernity. For instance, I was just talking with my assistant and we were speculating on whether or not there was a similar cycle of rites leading into the summer solstice. It would make sense if there was something that allowed for the same type of mindful descent into that celebration as well. One has to prepare to enter holy space and to experience holy places, times, and rites after all. There is so much more work to do in restoring our ritual cycles. 

Some people are actually starting the celebration Sunwait tonight (Wednesday), but we do ours on Friday, because it is such a lovely way to conclude the working week. To be honest, Sunday would probably be a more logical day to hold this rite, since it is Sunna’s day, but that doesn’t seem to be the trend anywhere that I’ve encountered yet. 

Anyway, we’re going to have our first celebration this Friday, and I shall post mini-recaps each week, just like I did last year for our first Sunwait. Are any of you, my readers, celebrating this? Please feel free to post in the comments. 

Sunna by W. McMillan

Sunwait Week 5: Sunna and Raido

We always begin our rites with a fire blessing that ends with the words Thunor weoh three times. Thor hallow. He is the one to Whom we turn, along with fire itself, to protect, cleanse, and gird our sacred space, and tonight He, along with Sunna, was so very present. Our ritual was humbling and it left me in tears. I have never before had a particular devotional relationship with either Thor or Sunna…until this year, and with Sunna, that didn’t really happen until this Sunwait. Suddenly, I have a sense of Them, Their Presence, and the mysteries They bring. I never expected this, and it is a blessing. Sitting in ritual Their presence – Sunna, Thor, and even raido– was so soothing and peaceful, so very there. It has completely transformed the room, something we all felt, and I think from here on out, it may well have likewise transformed my devotional relationship with these Powers. I am so very, very grateful for even the barest sense of Them, and the way I felt Them tonight, it really underscored what a tremendously holy time Yule is, and certainly why our ancestors honored both Thor and Sunna so fervently (1)!

It also occurred to me during the ritual that there is a very potent relationship between Sunna and Thor (as colleagues), particularly when it comes to hallowing. It was the last thing I expected to sense. I think in part, there is a genealogical connection between Them too. In the tradition I follow, Nott is Sunna’s aunt, but She is also Thor’s grandmother through Her daughter Jorð, the Goddess of the earth. That makes Thor and Sunna some type of cousins, I think first cousins once-removed (it also means that Dagr is Thor’s uncle, since Dagr is also a child of Nott – though with a different father than Jorð. Nott had three husbands and She had a child with each) (2).

Raido surprised me too. At first it was difficult to capture its rhythm in the galdr, but then that rune came showing itself as a gauntlet worn by Sunna, as a power that opens the way, as a force that barrels right over any obstacles, brooking no resistance, and also as a rune whose power has been knit into the very fabric of the cosmic architecture (3). 

For the ritual tonight, my housemate Tatyana and I co-wrote the following prayer. Instead of our regular prayers last night, we meditated on Sunna for a time, and then I wrote the first line of each couplet, and she wrote the second. We each tapped into different aspects of Sunna, which was really powerful. I think I want to take some serious devotional time this year to really explore Sunna and all the ways She may manifest. 

Prayer to Sunna with Raido
(by G. Krasskova and T. Vitta)


Hail to Sunna, Who roars across the sky, 
skipping in a half circle through the clouds. 

Hail to Sunna, Whom no force can stop, 
a rolling, roaring fire, unfolding, expanding, and glorious. 

Hail to Sunna, wielding the magic of fire, 
burning away all darkness, ensuring survival. 

Hail to Sunna, mighty Magus,
driving out all pollution, wickedness, and harm 
with Her unstoppable force. 

Hail to Sunna, Whose presence brings healing,
destroying all infection, all that hinders 
the relentless progression of life. 

Hail to Sunna, Who orders the calculated roar of time, 
from summer to fall, fall to winter, to spring, to summer again, 
Inexorable Power. 

Hail to Sunna, Shamaness of the spheres, 
wielding raido in joyous synergy. 

Hail to Sunna, mighty Mother, 
Who opens the way, showering light and blessings
on all the Worlds. 

Hail to Sunna, Who paves the way for Nott, 
welcoming darkness in its rightful time, 
and bringing us to well-earned rest. 


Hail to Sunna, now and forever. 
Hail to Sunna, Glorious Power. 

There is now one more week of Sunwait,  a little over a week until Yule. The rune for next week’s Sunwait is kenaz, and that seems a very fitting way to encapsulate the blessings and holiness of Yule (4). 

Notes: 

  1. Of course, it shouldn’t surprise anyone that our polytheistic ancestors were pious, but in tonight’s ritual, I felt like I glimpsed some small measure of how fervently they must have felt about the importance of venerating these particular Holy Powers and why. 
  2. There is nothing in the Eddas about the relationship between Sunna and Nott, but some traditions accept, via shared personal gnosis, that Nott is Sunna’s aunt. Nott’s connection to Thor, however, is attested to in the Gylfaginning. It all really demonstrates though, how deeply interconnected the various families of our Gods are. 
  3. A huge part of that architecture is the cosmic cycles, the shifting of seasons, the turning of day to night to day again, the rhythm of tides and torrents all inexorable, all built into creation by our Gods. 
  4. The runes for Sunwait are really quite perfect a preparation for Yule. Fehu sets us on the right course with luck and blessings, uruz strengthens us for the journey, thurisaz challenges and cleans out any stagnation or corruption, ansuz opens everything up, clearing out the road ahead, raido increases the momentum until we reach kenaz, which encapsulates the holy fire of Yule. It’s a truly beautiful preparation. 

Sunwait Week 4: Sunna and Ansuz

With this week, we move into the week of Ansuz, thank every God that is. The week of thurisaz was rough, even though it brought many productive and fruitful epiphanies. It was really, really rough though and while I work very well with the rune thurisaz, and consider him one of my primary runic allies, I must admit with all respect, that I am breathing a sigh of significant relief as we move into ansuz. I will say though, with thurisaz at the helm, I got quite a lot of work done! He really helps to focus one’s energy and intellectual might. I’m grateful for that. 

We began our rite as we always do, with an Anglo-Saxon fire cleansing, then offered the following prayer (which I wrote –Tatyana and I have been trading off, but thurisaz and ansuz were my weeks). 

Prayer to Sunna
 
Havamal verse 148.
A fourth I know: if men make fast
in chains the joints of my limbs, 
when I sing that song which shall set me free,
spring the fetters from hands and feet.
 
And so it is.
You Sunna, come with ansuz. 
You wield it like a mighty spear, 
a battle cry, a flight of ravens in Your brilliant light. 
It is the incantation with which You open all roads before You. 
 
This then, is my prayer:
Come with the power to loosen the fetters that bind us. 
Come with the power to open the way before us.
Come with the power that causes all roads yield to Your command. 
Obliterate all obstacles that keep us from clean devotion. 
Your words have power. Speak the runes that restore creation,
and teach us the prayers to support You in this work. 
 
Hail to You, Sunna, Shining Glory of the sky,
Blessed Power of the House of Mundilfari. 

After the prayer, I galdred ansuz, and while this is a rune that I consider a particular ally, it was difficult to find the rhythm appropriate to ansuz and Sunna. It came through – I asked the rune to show me – and the galdr was very productive. We shared a horn of a lovely grapefruit flavored rose (I usually have much more high brow taste in wine but damn the rose was good! I’ve never seen the horn empty quite so quickly lol), offered more prayers and finally concluded with pouring out offerings and Sigdrifa’s Prayer. Yule is one more week closer! 

Sunwait – Week 3: Sunna and Thurisaz

I feel like we’re getting into a nice rhythm with our Sunwait rituals. I’m really loving this gentle and ritualized progression toward Yule, and as I said the other night to a friend, I’m really, really glad that we decided to incorporate Sunwait into our hearth cultus this year. Since we decided to do our rites on Fridays, it’s also a lovely way to cap off the week (a particularly significant transition since we tend to immerse ourselves in ritual and devotional work over the weekends). 

So, last night, as is our norm, we began by bearing fire around our space, chanting the fire cleansing song that I learned more than twenty years ago, and asking Thor to cleanse, purify, and bless our space. I wrote about Thor before here. He may specifically be invoked as “Guardian of the Shrine” before rituals to consecrate the space and rite. Thor is awesome. Then, I explained the purpose of the ritual – we all knew, as we’d agreed as a household to do this, but stating that intention was one more way to center our minds and allow for a smooth transition into the appropriate headspace for reverent veneration. After that, I offered the following prayer to Sunna and lit the three candles (the candles for weeks one and two are only about half way burned down):  

Prayer to Sunna
 
Force and fire, that is what You are, 
Swift precision as You plough across the sky, 
Driving back pollution, and cleansing the path
that Day must tread.  Force and fire,
bringing the light that restores our souls,
bringing Your glorious brightness to our world. 
You are force and fire, gleaming and fierce.
Battle ready, You are indomitable. 
There is no obstacle You cannot surmount, 
No enemy You cannot conquer. 
You drive forward the rhythms of the world. 
You smite malefica, wickedness, evil, 
and all that stands against the order created by our Gods. 
These things You obliterate with the force and fire 
of Your passing. That order is Your order, 
blessed and structured by Your holy hands,
and always will You defend it. 
Teach us, oh Sunna, to stand courageously
no matter how afraid we might be,
in defense of that order too. 
Hail to You, Glorious Goddess of the Sun,
May You grant us bravery in our devotions,
as You move across our world 
leading us to Yule. 
 

After this, I galdred thurisaz which came so joyously (there’s really no other word for it). It was like the force of a storm wind hitting the house. That’s how it felt to galdr this rune. He came immediately and with such a tremendous kinetic energy that it left me wired for hours afterwards. We passed a horn filled with sparkling apple cider and hailed Sunna, Her family, Thor, Odin and the runes, our ancestors, and more. After this, we sat down in sacred space, in holy space, and brought out our divination materials. We had been talking earlier about the small asteroid orbiting the moon, and had wondered if it was a physical representation that Mani had had a child. We meant no impiety by divining, but if He had, we wanted to know how or even if we should include that child in our veneration of the House of Mundilfari. We stumbled into epiphany and mystery and I am still shaken by it. 

Sunna wanted this story told or I would not speak it. 
The holy order of the heavens will not fall. 
She and Mani were joyous and the rune that fell was wunjo:
Joy, perfection, a blessed gift. 
They had a child, star of heaven, Himinstjarna,* 
A glorious daughter (fehu tells us how to honor Her:
Song and beauty, art that elevates the soul, 
Land and life and glory, freeing the world of its disorder). 
I thought it lovely and we were moved to tears,
Then I realized what a terrible omen it was, 
but what a powerful hope too. 
The sun and moon will not fall:
Their continuity is ensured by Their child. 
She will bring Them back from the darkness.
A magical gift, hope for our world. 
Mani prepares to go to war. 
Taking up His scimitars again, 
For He was a warrior in days of old. 
But the holy order of the Gods will endure. 
Himinstjarna: praise Her.
 

We closed the div session and then sang Sigdrifa’s Prayer, which is our way of closing almost every ritual. After that, we staggered off to get food, because after the spiritual work that was done, we were ravenous. So, that’s where we are and I think the House of Mundilfari will play a far larger role in our devotions from here on out. 

Mani by V. Hardy

*this is Her name to the best that we could translate with divination, and an ON grammar.